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Brewing with Wheat

Brewing with Wheat

Brewing with Wheat

  • Used Book in Good Condition

The wit and weizen of wheat beers. Author Stan Hieronymus visits the ancestral homes of the world’s most interesting styles-Hoegaarden, Kelheim, Leipzig, Berlin and even Portland, Oregon-to sort myth from fact and find out how the beers are made today. Complete with brewing details and recipes for even the most curious brewer, and answers to compelling questions such as Why is my beer cloudy? and With or without lemon?

List Price: $ 17.95

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3 comments

  1. 15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Culture and Craftmanship in Several Traditions, March 19, 2010
    By 
    M. Hall (Philadelphia) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Brewing with Wheat (Paperback)

    Homebrewers familiar with Stan’s excellent “Brew Like a Monk” will be immediately in familiar territory with this book. The writing is engaging and personal, and draws attention to the importance of each brewer’s individuality in creating the diversity of wheat beer styles around the world; the reader gets to know many people while reading the book.

    Rather than being a recipe book of steps to follow, this book fills the role of spending time with both the brewers who make these beers, and an experienced beer writer who can help collate the massive amount of knowledge and opinion out there about how to create them. “Brewing With Wheat” is not only about how to brew a good wheat beer, but also about why the featured brewers think these are best practices.

    There is certainly technical information, but without being prescriptive. Stan assumes the readers of this book are already good brewers who can think about what is being made and adapt ideas to their own systems and preferences. And yet, as specific as some information is, it avoids telling you what to do. That will certainly be frustrating for some, but it is exactly how I think about my brewing. I’m looking forward to this book getting as shopworn as “Brew Like a Monk” has become.

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  2. Charles Jason Osicka
    10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Wealth of Wheat Brewing Know How, April 19, 2010
    By 
    Charles Jason Osicka (Parker, CO) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Brewing with Wheat (Paperback)

    This is an excellent book, well thought out, source of wheat brewing history and knowledge. Great book for beginner to advanced home brewer. It really appealed to my tastes since I’m a professional engineer working in the beer, wine and fermented beverage industries. There’s not much technically but once you read it, go back and reread as there is a wealth of hidden technical information from which to extrapolate hidden brewing secretes. I use this book as a source for wheat brewing and wheat recipe development. This is a must-have for any serious brewer.

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  3. 8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent Comprehensive Resource, October 17, 2010
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Brewing with Wheat (Paperback)

    Let me begin by saying that I am not a big wheat beer fan. However, I found Stan Hieronymus’ previous book, Brew Like a Monk, to be one of the most well-researched and comprehensive books on brewing to any style available. He provides a tremendous amount of information from many sources that gave me a tremendous insight into the process of brewing a diverse array of beers. These are beers I love, and frequently try to brew. Given how much I liked his earlier book, I bought this book to see if he could get me similar interested in beers that are the minority of wheat I drink and brew.

    Much like his previous book, Brewing with Wheat provides an incredibly well-researched, incredibly comprehensive discussion of brewing wheat beers. He covers all the classic styles in great depth, talking to a range of producers, and even researches details on more rarely brewed, antiquated styles. The information extensive, ranging from ingredients used from producers, to very specific temperature and flavor charts for ALL commercially available wheat yeasts. Some (including myself) may find that his anecdotal discussion style may lead to some long-winded sections that are occasionally tangential. However, it is very readable and the information is top-notch. It gave me many ideas, including insights on how to brew better versions of these beers.

    I have tested out several of the techniques listed and consider this to be a valuable addition to my brewing library. I was able to brew better wheat beer almost immediately, and to utilize several techniques to control flavor characteristics (e.g., creating a lower-ester, higher phenol heffeweizen through a combination of mash and fermentation techniques). In particular, I think the table of yeast strains provided at the back of the book (even more comprehensive than Brew Like A Monk) is an incredible resource to any brewer who wishes to brew wheat beers. I also appreciate that Gordon Strong, one of the most noted American beer judges, provides insights what judges look for in these beers, including common off-flavors and mistakes. These not only let people know what to do, but also make it clear what is inappropriate for these beers as well.

    I want to emphasize, this is not an instruction manual or a basic recipe book. It’s a discussion of the ingredients, techniques, and processes used by commercial brewers and several homebrewers. It lets you know what producers do and why, so you can assess that information yourself and determine the best way to use it. While there are a couple recipes, this is not a basic how-to manual. It assumes you are at least familiar with basic brewing processes and science. Beginning brewers should first read books like How to Brew, The Complete Joy of Homebrewing, or similar manuals to understand the techniques described within them. Those looking to simply get good recipes have a number of other options. Those who want to think about making truly great wheat beer should read this book.

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