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Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation

Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation

Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation

This is the first comprehensive book ever written on the sacred aspects of indigenous, historical psychotropic and herbal healing beers of the world.

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2 comments

  1. Christopher R. Travers "Einhverfr"
    70 of 72 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Interesting recipes, great herbal info, October 29, 1999
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation (Paperback)

    I find this book fascinating! Months after buying it, I find myself sitting down to look for a recipe to try, and spending hours reading the historical and herbal notes. Never would have expected the best herbal I own to be a beer book! There is also information on the religious practices of early Celts and Norwegians as they relate to the use of herbs, as well as lots of information on the spiritual use of herbs by modern traditional peoples.

    As for the beers themselves, Buhner takes a relaxed attitude. Indigenous people make beer without fancy equipment, and we can too. What matters most is what tastes good to us–which means we have to do a lot of experimenting! There are lots of recipes to try here, from the Middle Ages up to the present. But the choice is not as wide as it first looks, because not all of the ingredients are easily available. If you get into this, the next book you’ll want may be “The Brewer’s Garden.”

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  2. Charles Andrew Wingard
    40 of 40 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Excellent work, September 29, 2010
    By 

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Sacred and Herbal Healing Beers: The Secrets of Ancient Fermentation (Paperback)

    First a word on safety. A few of these recipes use toxic ingredients. In general, my studies all suggest however that these ingredients both have long records in brewing and also are reasonably safe in that area. This includes both mandrake and henbane. In fact, henbane was smoked in the Middle Ages, and evidence exists for its use in beer for thousands of years. Mandrake was well known medicinally mixed with wine (Dioscorides mentions it, and mandrake wine seems to have been utilized by Hannibal as a narcotic). However, in all things some caution is required, and there are a few other steps I’d recommend:

    1) It’s probably a good idea to try small doses of such recipes until you know how your body will respond.
    2) It’s probably a good idea to do further research before you make up your mind on these matters.

    Now for a word on substance. This book is written from a very primitivist perspective. The author is upfront about his views in this area, and tries to share them. I didn’t feel like the book was overly proselytizing in this area, though I recognize that some fellow reviewers differ here.

    Secondly he advocates what one might call “unscientific brewing.” I’m a big fan of unscientific brewing. I’ve brewed in similar ways for nearly two decades. In this way, sense, artistry, and experience are used to produce a beer, mead, etc rather than rigorous measurement and control. For example, I sterilize all my equipment with heat (I don’t use chemicals), I don’t even own a hydrometer, and and I brew beer using touch and feel rather than time and temperature. In this way, I sacrifice some repeatability for variation and an ability to improvise at each step. Sometimes my recipes flop but since each one is an experiment, I just take note about what failed and go on. I figure this is the way brewing was done for centuries and I don’t need to change. My view on this, as a long-time “unscientific brewer” is subtly different than Bruhner’s. I think to some extent his writings make light of the careful ways that traditional cultures may have for controlling wort infection and the like, and tends to gloss over the role of deep, long-term experience in what was traditionally an art form much like poetry. These shortcomings may be acceptable given his audience (those just starting out), but it’s worth noting up front. All in all, I think this is an important contribution to the area of brewing in this area. I may not agree with him on every point, but more voices help us all move forward.

    Thirdly he provides a large number of recipes. These include molasses-based drinks, white sugar-based drinks, fermented fruit-based beverages, and the like. In general these track various other attempts at various beverages that I have seen, and many of his recipes are taken from old sources. These do not fit in well with standard contemporary brewing approaches which frown on sucrose sources and favor fructose instead, but when one is experienced (see paragraph above), one can still take them as inspiration and adapt them to whatever one wants to make (substituting honey for white sugar, for example). At the same time, I have had commercially produced molasses “beers” (i.e. brewed with molasses instead of malted grain) and they are quite pleasant. Consequently I have to assume that most of the recipes would be just fine how they are. I would however note that it is likely that “sugar” in many of the old recipes was the sort of dried cane syrup one can find at Mexican grocers than the white sugar we use today. This area could be fertile ground for future research.

    However, whatever faults this book has, it’s still a fascinating journey into another world in terms of brewing. I enjoyed it and I see why it was highly recommended to me. It is a solid contribution to this field and I’d highly recommend it to others.

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