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The New Complete Joy of Home Brewing

The New Complete Joy of Home Brewing

The New Complete Joy of Home Brewing

Stouts, ales, lagers, porters, bitters, pilseners, specialtybeers, and meads. . .they’re all remarkably easy to make! WithThe New Complete Joy of Home Brewing — acclaimed by criticsand amateur brewmeisters alike as the best and most authoritative guide on the market — you can learn to make beer just the way you like it! And it’s fun! Whether you prefer a richer, creamier head, a more flavorsome, full-bodied brew, or a sparkling, sweeter ale — from the lightest lager to the darkest stout — as

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2 comments

  1. 53 of 56 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Easy to understand for the novice brewer, April 22, 2000
    By 
    James Dedik (In the sticks, PA) –

    This review is from: The New Complete Joy of Home Brewing (Paperback)

    I purchased this book when I first began homebrewing about 7 years ago. I found it was very easy to read and Charlie’s “Don’t worry, have a homebrew!” attitude towards beer brewing took the fear out of brewing my first few batches of beer. His carefree approach is a “180″ from Dave Miller’s approach. I would actually suggest to a novice, if the cash is available, that you purchase and read both Papazian and Miller’s books thoroughly before staring your first batch of beer. All the information may not sink in at first, but it only takes a few batches of beer and everything will make sense. They both contain good points on brewing your first beer.

    I would like to point out one step in Papazian’s book that should be avoided at all levels of brewing, and that is, the aeration of the wort when it’s hot. Please keep this in mind as you read this book. It will make sense after you read the first section for beginners. Papazian suggests, for simplicity sake, that you pour the 3 gallons of hot wort from your brew pot into a container that already contains 2 gallons of cold water. This is not a good practice at any level of brewing. Aeration of the wort is a two way street. Although necessary for the proper yeast life cycle necessary for the conversion of the sugars to alcohol and carbon dioxide, If you aerate the wort when it’s too hot, or after the beer has began fermenting (which Charlie does warn you about), you could ruin your finished product. If you read the later chapters in the book, you’ll find reference to wort chillers and chilling the wort quickly.

    Most books written to date suggest that you cool the beer to below 80 degrees F before aerating. This is what I practice, as do most of the other homebrewers that I keep in touch with. You don’t have to buy an expensive copper or stainless steel wort chiller to accomplish this quick cooling of the wort. All you need is a bathtub filled with cold water. You can take your brewing pot straight from the stove to the tub and simply submerge it in the water for a few minutes (remember to keep the pot covered!). Hope this helps out, happy homebrewing. Also, you can get some very good info at the following site; [...] This is a private homebrewing site which contains lots of good info on homebrewing. Also, there is a live chat room there where you can ask questions and get some free technical info on starting your first brew.

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  2. 19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A must-have reference for new & intermediate brewers, November 20, 2003
    By 
    Brian A. Schar (Menlo Park, CA United States) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: The New Complete Joy of Home Brewing (Paperback)

    When you first feel the desire to brew beer, and start looking into the process, it can seem pretty formidable. Walking into the homebrew store or visiting its website, and seeing all the ingredients and equipment, can be intimidating for the newcomer. Turning to the web, magazines and books for enlightenment, the first-timer can be intimidated by the sheer volume of brewing information floating around. Rather than throwing your hands up in confusion and walking away, buy this book.

    Papazian’s motto is “Relax, don’t worry–have a homebrew!” Rather than getting bogged down in the details of making perfect, contest-winning beers, Papazian focuses on the basic steps a homebrewer has to follow to make good beer. You can make something tasty and enjoyable with minimal equipment, malt extract and part of a weekend afternoon, and Papazian holds the brewer’s hand through the entire process. Once you’ve nailed the basics–and it’s not hard–the last part of the book teaches you how to advance to intermediate brewing without much additional hassle.

    Experienced brewers may find this book too basic for their needs. Beginning and intermediate brewers will find it invaluable.

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